La ségrégation, un mal belge ?

  • Posted on: 9 February 2015
  • By: jdanhier
Segregation, a belgian scourge ?

Foreword: The following analyses are extracted from the report Vers des écoles de qualité pour tous ? Analyse des résultats à l'enquête PISA 2012 en Flandre et en Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles. PISA ("Program for International Student Assessment") is a research project conducted by the OECD which aims to assess “the extent to which students near the end of compulsory education have acquired some of the knowledge and skills that are essential for full participation in modern society 1. " This large-scale survey has been conducted every three years since 2000 and currently covers 65 countries (approximately 510,000 students aged 15 surveyed). PISA allows to measure some skills useful to the market economy, even though it does not cover the entire spectrum of educational missions. It provides a tool, albeit imperfect, but very useful for comparing educational systems.

School segregation is defined here as the spatial separation of students with characteristics valued differently by society2. Many indices have been proposed to measure the uneven distribution of students within schools. One of these traditional indices has met some recent success in the Belgian French-speaking Community (FWB)3, in particular in view of the work of Stephen Gorard and Chris Taylor4. This segregation index can be interpreted as the proportion of students in a particular group that should be exchanged to achieve an equal distribution of these students among schools.

Figure 1: Segregation Indices [confidence interval] and (Rank)

Country Academic Socioecon.
Germany 50,9 [47,8;54] (19) 39,6 [36,6;42,7] (22)
Austria 49,5 [45,9;53,1] (18) 35,8 [32,5;39] (15)
Canada 34,4 [31,8;36,9] (12) 33,8 [31,3;36,4] (11)
Denmark 33,5 [30,2;36,8] (11) 38,6 [35,2;42] (20)
Spain 27,7 [25,4;29,9] (4) 31,7 [28,9;34,6] (5)
USA 29,6 [26,1;33,1] (7) 37,1 [33,1;41,1] (18)
FWB 42,4 [38,5;46,2] (15) 35,8 [32,3;39,3] (16)
Finland 28 [23,7;32,3] (5) 24,3 [21,1;27,5] (1)
Flanders 51,7 [47,6;55,8] (20) 36,2 [33,3;39,2] (17)
France 52,5 [49,5;55,5] (21) 39 [36,4;41,6] (21)
Greece 28,6 [26,1;31,1] (6) 38,3 [35;41,7] (19)
Ireland 34,6 [29,8;39,4] (14) 33,6 [29,9;37,3] (10)
Iceland 25,6 [20,9;30,4] (3) 32,1 [27,2;37] (6)
Italy 44 [41,8;46,1] (17) 34,4 [32,8;35,9] (13)
Luxemburg 32,7 [30,8;34,6] (10) 35 [32,5;37,6] (14)
Norway 24,9 [22,2;27,6] (2) 26,3 [23,5;29] (2)
Netherlands 60,2 [56,5;63,9] (22) 32,4 [28,1;36,6] (7)
Poland 31,5 [27,5;35,5] (8) 33 [29,6;36,4] (8)
Portugal 34,5 [31,1;38] (13) 34 [30,4;37,6] (12)
UK 32,4 [29;35,9] (9) 33,4 [30,9;36] (9)
Sweden 23,1 [20,3;25,8] (1) 29,4 [27,2;31,7] (3)
Switzerland 42,6 [38,4;46,7] (16) 30,6 [28,3;32,9] (4)

 

Various variables can be selected and various types of segregation can be studied. In Figure 1, we present, for each system, its academic segregation (the target group being students below level 2 of the PISA proficiency scale, i.e. the minimum level required to to take part in the social life) and socioeconomic segregation (the target group being the 15% most disadvantaged students in the system). The numbers in brackets provide the ranking of educational systems5, from the least segregated (1) to the more segregated one (22).

With segregation indexes rising to 51.7 [47.6; 55.8] and 36.2 [33.3; 39.2], segregation in Flanders is among the most extensive on both the academic and socioeconomic dimensions. The FWB is slightly less segregated from the academic point of view (42.4 [38.5; 46.2]), but equivalently from the socioeconomic one (35.8 [32.3; 39.3]). With no doubt, segregation deeply characterizes these two Belgian systems. The same can be said for Germany or France. Amongst the least segregated countries, we find the Scandinavian countries. However, academic and socioeconomic segregation do not always go together. The Netherlands, for example, are highly segregated on the academic variable, but little on the socioeconomic one, while it is quite the opposite for Greece.

Figure 2: Variance score (between schools left, and between students right)

A second way to approach this problem is through multilevel analysis. It is common practice to divide the variance of the dependent variable according to whether it is ascribable to the individual or his belonging to a school. The higher the proportion of variance imputable to the school, the more the system will consist of schools with very different performances, but with a homogeneous population. In Figure 2, we observe that over 50% of the variance of the results remains at the school level in FWB and Flanders. In other words, students within schools are homogeneous in terms of performance. Again, such a configuration is not unavoidable, since in the Nordic countries there is little difference between schools. The dispersion of performance is rather between students and within schools. In other words, there are ‘strong’ students and ‘weak’ students in every school.

Figure 3: Equity (explained variance on the vertical axis) as a function of socioeconomic segregation (on the horizontal axis)

In Figure 3, we can observe a strong link between socioeconomic segregation (the horizontal axis) and equity (measured by the variance explained on the vertical axis). Equity requires defining (and justifying) which differences are fair6. According to a meritocratic approach, performance gaps can be regarded as unfair if they are due to differences in socioeconomic background. The used indicator (coefficient of determination) quantifies the importance of this link. The higher it is, the more the dispersion of student grades is explained by their background.

In this figure, we observe a strong contrast between countries that are both less segregated and more equitable at the socioeconomical level, and countries with a higher link between socioeconomic background and academic achievement and a higher segregation, such as German the education systems of France, Belgium, Portugal, and Germany.

Marc Demeuse and his colleagues focused on the structures put in place to separate the students 7. These structures, however, can be very diverse. It is therefore necessary to consider a variety of indicators, including the age at first track choice and the number of students in each track, the criteria to transfer from one grade to another, the use or not of grade repetition, the proportion of students in special education, the choices in terms of enrollment into age groups or ability levels. The authors used PISA 2003 data to show that the systems using structures as tools to separate students tend to be more segregated and thus highlight the weight of the school structure. For example, the Scandinavian countries have little school structures that split the students and present a lower segregation. If we look at the Figure 3, we see that the worst located systems (France, FWB, Flanders, Portugal and Germany) have structures to separate students (relatively short common curriculum and separate streams). Other authors have shown that in countries with a high school segregation, there is a stronger link between the level of knowledge of students and their social background than in countries with a higher social heterogeneity in schools 8

  • 1. OECD (2014). PISA 2012 Results: What students know and can do. Paris : OECD Publishing. P. 23.
  • 2. Delvaux, B. (2005). Ségrégation scolaire dans un contexte de libre choix et de ségrégation résidentielle. In M. Demeuse, A. Baye, M.-H. Straeten, J. Nicaise, & A. Matoul (Éds), Vers une école juste et effiace (p. 275-295). Bruxelles: De Boeck.
  • 3. Baye, A., Benadusi, L., Bottani, G., Bove, G., Demeuse, M., Garcia de Cortazar, M., Giancola, O., Gorard, S., Hutmacher, W., Matoul, A., Meuret, D., Morlais, S., Nicaise, J., Ricotta, G., Smith, E., Straeten, M.-H., Tana-Ferrer, A. & Vandenberghe, V. (2005). L’équité des systèmes éducatifs européens. Un ensemble d’indicateurs. Liège : Service de pédagogie théorique et expérimentale.
    Demeuse, M. & Friant, N. (2010). School segregation in the French Community of Belgium. In International perspectives on countering school segregation (p. 169‑187). Antwerpen/Apeldoors : Garant.
  • 4. Gorard, S. & Taylor, C. (2002). What is Segregation? A Comparison of Measures in Terms of ‘Strong’ and ‘Weak’ Compositional Invariance. Sociology, 36(4), 875‑895.
  • 5. For more details, please refer to the publication (available in French and Dutch). We chose to put our remarks in an international comparative perspective by selecting 21 education systems relatively close to us: Belgium (where we distinguish Dutch- and French-speaking communities), the other countries of Western Europe, defined here as the area covering the countries of the former EU-15, Iceland, Switzerland and Norway, which we add two countries of North America (US and Canada) and one country of Eastern Europe (Poland). This selection is somewhat arbitrary, and other choices would also have been possible, but we decided to limit ourselves to these 21 systems for readability reasons.
  • 6. Demeuse, M. & Baye, A. (2005). Pourquoi parler d’équité ? In M. Demeuse, A. Baye, M.-H. Straeten, J. Nicaise, & A. Matoul (Éds), Vers une école juste et efficace (p. 149‑170). Bruxelles : De Boeck.
  • 7. Baye, A. & Demeuse, M. (2008). Indicateurs d’équité éducative. Une analyse de la ségrégation académique et sociale dans les pays européens. Revue française de pédagogie, 165(4), 91‑103.
    Demeuse, M., Crahay, M. & Monseur, C. (2001). Efficiency and Equity. In W. Hutmacher, D. Cochrane, & N. Bottani (Éds), In Pursuit of Equity in Education (p. 65‑91). Springer Netherlands.
  • 8. Duru-Bellat, M., Mons, N. & Suchaut, B. (2004). Inégalités sociales entre élèves et organisation des systèmes éducatifs : quelques enseignements de l’enquête PISA (Note 04/02 de l’Institut de Recherche sur l’Education). Dijon : Iredu.
    Hanushek, E. A. & Woessmann, L. (2006). Does educational tracking affect performance and inequality? Differences-in-differences evidence across countries. The Economic Journal, 116(510), C63–C76.

Avant-propos: Les analyses qui suivent sont extraites du rapport Vers des écoles de qualité pour tous ? Analyse des résultats à l'enquête PISA 2012 en Flandre et en Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles. PISA (“Program for International Student Assessment”) est un projet de recherche mené par l’OCDE qui vise à évaluer “dans quelle mesure les élèves qui approchent du terme de leur scolarité obligatoire possèdent certaines des connaissances et compétences essentielles pour participer pleinement à la vie de nos sociétés modernes1.” Cette enquête à large échelle a été conduite tous les trois ans depuis 2000 et concerne actuellement 65 pays (approximativement 510 000 étudiants de 15 ans interrogés). PISA permet de mesurer certaines compétences essentielles à l’économie de marché, même si elle ne couvre pas l’entièreté du spectre des missions de l’éducation. Elle fournit un outil, certes imparfait, mais très utile pour comparer les systèmes d’enseignement.

La ségrégation scolaire est définie, ici, comme la séparation spatiale d’étudiants porteurs de caractéristiques différemment valorisées par la société2. De nombreux indices ont été proposés dans la littérature pour mesurer l’inégale répartition des élèves au sein des écoles, selon qu’ils appartiennent ou non à un groupe cible. L’un de ces indices classiques a connu quelques succès récents en Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles3, notamment suite aux travaux de Stephen Gorard et Chris Taylor4. Cet indice de ségrégation peut être interprété comme la proportion d’élèves d’un groupe donné qui devraient être échangés pour atteindre une égale répartition de ces élèves entre les écoles.

Figure 1 : Indices de ségrégation, [intervalle de confiance] et (rang)

Pays Académique Socio-éco.
Allemagne 50,9 [47,8;54] (19) 39,6 [36,6;42,7] (22)
Autriche 49,5 [45,9;53,1] (18) 35,8 [32,5;39] (15)
Canada 34,4 [31,8;36,9] (12) 33,8 [31,3;36,4] (11)
Danemark 33,5 [30,2;36,8] (11) 38,6 [35,2;42] (20)
Espagne 27,7 [25,4;29,9] (4) 31,7 [28,9;34,6] (5)
États-Unis 29,6 [26,1;33,1] (7) 37,1 [33,1;41,1] (18)
Féd. Wal.-Bru. 42,4 [38,5;46,2] (15) 35,8 [32,3;39,3] (16)
Finlande 28 [23,7;32,3] (5) 24,3 [21,1;27,5] (1)
Flandre 51,7 [47,6;55,8] (20) 36,2 [33,3;39,2] (17)
France 52,5 [49,5;55,5] (21) 39 [36,4;41,6] (21)
Grèce 28,6 [26,1;31,1] (6) 38,3 [35;41,7] (19)
Irlande 34,6 [29,8;39,4] (14) 33,6 [29,9;37,3] (10)
Islande 25,6 [20,9;30,4] (3) 32,1 [27,2;37] (6)
Italie 44 [41,8;46,1] (17) 34,4 [32,8;35,9] (13)
Luxembourg 32,7 [30,8;34,6] (10) 35 [32,5;37,6] (14)
Norvège 24,9 [22,2;27,6] (2) 26,3 [23,5;29] (2)
Pays-Bas 60,2 [56,5;63,9] (22) 32,4 [28,1;36,6] (7)
Pologne 31,5 [27,5;35,5] (8) 33 [29,6;36,4] (8)
Portugal 34,5 [31,1;38] (13) 34 [30,4;37,6] (12)
Royaume-Uni 32,4 [29;35,9] (9) 33,4 [30,9;36] (9)
Suède 23,1 [20,3;25,8] (1) 29,4 [27,2;31,7] (3)
Suisse 42,6 [38,4;46,7] (16) 30,6 [28,3;32,9] (4)

 

Différentes variables peuvent être sélectionnées et différents types de ségrégation étudiés. Dans la figure 1, nous présentons pour chaque système, sa ségrégation académique (le groupe cible étant les étudiants sous le niveau 2 de l’échelle de compétence PISA, à savoir le niveau minimal requis pour participer à la vie sociétale) et sa ségrégation socioéconomique (le groupe cible étant les 15 % d’étudiants les plus défavorisés au sein de ce système). Les chiffres entre parenthèses fournissent le classement des systèmes éducatifs5, allant du moins ségrégé (1) au plus ségrégé (22).

Avec des indices de ségrégation s’élevant à 51,7 [47,6;55,8] et à 36,2 [33,3;39,2], la Flandre présente une ségrégation parmi les plus importantes tant sur la dimension académique que socioéconomique. La Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles est légèrement moins ségrégée du point de vue académique (42,4 [38,5;46,2]), mais de manière équivalente du point de vue socioéconomique (35,8 [32,3;39,3]). À n’en pas douter, la ségrégation caractérise profondément les deux systèmes belges. Le même constat peut être fait pour l’Allemagne ou la France. Parmi les systèmes scolaires les moins ségrégés, nous retrouvons notamment les pays scandinaves. Ségrégations académique et socioéconomique ne vont toutefois pas toujours de pair. Les Pays-Bas, par exemple, sont fortement ségrégés sur la variable académique, mais peu en ce qui concerne la variable socioéconomique alors que c’est tout l’inverse pour la Grèce.

Figure 2 : Partition de la variance (entre les écoles à gauche, entre les élèves et au sein des écoles à droite)

Une seconde manière d’approcher cette problématique est fournie par l’analyse multiniveaux. Il y est courant de diviser la variance des résultats selon qu’elle est imputable aux individus ou à leur appartenance à une école. Plus la proportion de la variance attribuable à l’école est importante plus le système sera constitué d’écoles aux performances très diverses, mais dont les populations sont homogènes. On observe dans la figure 2 que plus de 50 % de la variance des résultats se trouve au niveau des écoles en Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles et en Flandre. En d’autres termes, les écoles ont un public très homogène en termes de performances scolaires. À nouveau, une telle configuration n’est pas inéluctable puisque dans les pays nordiques, il n’y a guère de différences entre les écoles. La dispersion des performances se situe plutôt entre les élèves et au sein même des écoles. En d’autres termes, il y a des élèves « forts » et des élèves « faibles » dans toutes les écoles.

Figure 3 : Équité (variance expliquée sur l’axe vertical) en fonction de la ségrégation socioéconomique (sur l’axe horizontal)

Dans la figure 3, nous pouvons observer un lien fort entre la ségrégation socioéconomique (mesuré par l'indice de ségrégation sur l’axe horizontal) et l’équité (mesurée par la variance expliquée sur l’axe vertical). L’équité, nécessitant de définir (et de justifier) quels écarts sont justes6. Selon une approche méritocratique, des écarts de performance peuvent être considérés comme injustes s’ils sont dus à des différences d’origine socioéconomique. L’indicateur utilisé (le coefficient de détermination) quantifie l’importance de ce lien. Plus il est élevé, plus l’origine explique la dispersion des résultats des élèves.

Sur cette figure, nous observons une opposition forte entre les pays qui sont à la fois peu ségrégés et équitables du point de vue socioéconomique et des pays où le poids de l’origine sur la réussite scolaire et la ségrégation sont importants, comme les systèmes français, belges, portugais ou allemands.

Marc Demeuse et ses collègues ont mis l’accent sur les structures mises en place afin de séparer les élèves7. Ces structures peuvent toutefois être très diverses. Il est donc nécessaire de considérer une multitude d’indicateurs, notamment, l’âge de la première orientation et les effectifs de chaque filière, les normes de passage d’une année à l’autre, l’usage ou non du redoublement et la part des élèves ainsi maintenus, la proportion d’élèves dans l’enseignement spécialisé, les choix en matière d’inscriptions scolaires ou encore le regroupement en classes d’âge ou de niveau. Les auteurs ont fait l’exercice sur les données PISA 2003 et ont montré que les systèmes dont les structures déploient des outils pour séparer les élèves ont tendance à être plus ségrégés et soulignent ainsi le poids de la structure scolaire. À titre d’exemple, les pays scandinaves ont des structures scolaires séparant peu les élèves et présentent une plus faible ségrégation. Si nous observons la figure 3, nous remarquons que les systèmes les moins bien situés (France, Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles et Flandre, Portugal, Allemagne) ont des structures permettant de séparer les élèves (tronc commun relativement court et filières d’enseignement séparées). D’autres auteurs ont montré que dans les pays où la ségrégation scolaire est forte, le niveau de connaissance des élèves est davantage marqué par leur origine sociale que dans les pays où il y a davantage d’hétérogénéité sociale dans les écoles8.

  • 1. OCDE (2014). Résultats du PISA 2012 : Savoirs et savoir-faire des élèves. Paris : OECD Publishing. P. 23.
  • 2. Delvaux, B. (2005). Ségrégation scolaire dans un contexte de libre choix et de ségrégation résidentielle. In M. Demeuse, A. Baye, M.-H. Straeten, J. Nicaise, & A. Matoul (Éds), Vers une école juste et effiace (p. 275-295). Bruxelles: De Boeck.
  • 3. Baye, A., Benadusi, L., Bottani, G., Bove, G., Demeuse, M., Garcia de Cortazar, M., Giancola, O., Gorard, S., Hutmacher, W., Matoul, A., Meuret, D., Morlais, S., Nicaise, J., Ricotta, G., Smith, E., Straeten, M.-H., Tana-Ferrer, A. & Vandenberghe, V. (2005). L’équité des systèmes éducatifs européens. Un ensemble d’indicateurs. Liège : Service de pédagogie théorique et expérimentale.
    Demeuse, M. & Friant, N. (2010). School segregation in the French Community of Belgium. In International perspectives on countering school segregation (p. 169‑187). Antwerpen/Apeldoors : Garant.
  • 4. Gorard, S. & Taylor, C. (2002). What is Segregation? A Comparison of Measures in Terms of ‘Strong’ and ‘Weak’ Compositional Invariance. Sociology, 36(4), 875‑895.
  • 5. Pour plus de détails, veuillez vous référer à la publication (disponible en français et en néerlandais). Nous avons choisi de situer notre propos dans une perspective de comparaison internationale en sélectionnant 21 systèmes éducatifs relativement proches de nous : la Belgique (où nous distinguons la Flandre et la Fédération Wallonie-Bruxelles), les autres pays de l’Europe de l’Ouest, définie ici comme la région rassemblant les pays de l’ancienne Union européenne des 15, l’Islande, la Suisse et la Norvège auxquels nous ajoutons deux pays de l’Amérique du Nord (les États-Unis et le Canada) et un pays d’Europe de l’Est (la Pologne). Cette sélection est quelque peu arbitraire et d’autres choix auraient également été possibles, mais nous avons décidé de nous limiter à ces 21 systèmes par souci de lisibilité.
  • 6. Demeuse, M. & Baye, A. (2005). Pourquoi parler d’équité ? In M. Demeuse, A. Baye, M.-H. Straeten, J. Nicaise, & A. Matoul (Éds), Vers une école juste et efficace (p. 149‑170). Bruxelles : De Boeck.
  • 7. Baye, A. & Demeuse, M. (2008). Indicateurs d’équité éducative. Une analyse de la ségrégation académique et sociale dans les pays européens. Revue française de pédagogie, 165(4), 91‑103.
    Demeuse, M., Crahay, M. & Monseur, C. (2001). Efficiency and Equity. In W. Hutmacher, D. Cochrane, & N. Bottani (Éds), In Pursuit of Equity in Education (p. 65‑91). Springer Netherlands.
  • 8. Duru-Bellat, M., Mons, N. & Suchaut, B. (2004). Inégalités sociales entre élèves et organisation des systèmes éducatifs : quelques enseignements de l’enquête PISA (Note 04/02 de l’Institut de Recherche sur l’Education). Dijon : Iredu.
    Hanushek, E. A. & Woessmann, L. (2006). Does educational tracking affect performance and inequality? Differences-in-differences evidence across countries. The Economic Journal, 116(510), C63–C76.